Bringing Normal Back

Six and a half weeks.

Twelve scans.

A few answers (but mostly questions).

And I’ve had enough.

At the start we saw no reason to question our consultants when they brought us in for more scans. We welcomed the offer of answers, for more detail on the nature of our little girl’s little arm. It’s taken me until last week, the latest out of a long line of scans, to realise that they don’t have any more answers than I do. That right now, what would be the best thing for me, and consequently I guess, for Baby, would be to just get back to some kind of normality.

The latest consultant scan at our local hospital saw her right forearm measurements drop off of the chart beneath the bottom average length for her age. But we were told: “not to worry”. Try telling any parent not to worry when one of those little measurement dots drops off the bottom of the bloody page!

We were also told that she may yet have a digit or two. Then again, she may not. She may have some wrist movement, then again, maybe not.

Basically, we learnt absolutely nothing new. In a bid to reassure me, with all the best intentions in the world, we were also referred to another specialist clinic to have Baby’s heart checked out. They believe the arm anomaly to be caused by an issue with vascular development and, after a terrifying hesitation over her heart and a “I’ll come back to that,” from our consultant at the previous scan, they felt that ruling out cardio vascular syndromes would be sensible. At the time, still wiping gloop off my thoroughly prodded and poked bump, we readily agreed.

It was only later on that evening that I realised, categorically, without any of my characteristic indecisiveness and doubt that I didn’t want Baby to have a heart scan at all. I didn’t want to know whether there was a risk that there could be anything else wrong with my baby. I didn’t want to go through any more fuss, only to be told that everything is ok (as I feel in my gut it will be. I’ve dreamed all this before, of course). Before this latest appointment I had managed to get myself into a state of blissful calm and excitement for baby’s impending arrival. A couple of days spent in the idyll of my good friend’s home with her beautiful and captivating 10-week-old daughter was absolutely the best tonic I could have had to get me back on track.

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So we’ve pulled the plug on everything. We’ve cancelled our cardio referral and I’ve told my midwife that I don’t want any more appointments other than the usual check ups all pregnant ladies should have. It feels a little daring, a little rash, but right now it feels absolutely right. At almost 27 weeks we are well past the point of no return, and we wouldn’t have deviated at the crossroads whatever we may have known. If there are any issues with her heart, we’ll find out once she’s born and we’ll cross that bridge then, with her leading the way.

All of these feelings, the decision already made over dinner, were compounded and confirmed when we turned up for our privately-booked 4D scan experience that evening, after the latest raft of could-be/couldn’t-be’s. I had stressed on the phone at the point of booking that I didn’t want all the frills that the 4D scan service provided (including photo key rings, magnets and gift bags) and that all we really wanted was a little reassurance. To see her face was A’ok, to check her little hand and feet were all good, and of course, to see her little arm and to once and for all get an idea of what we were dealing with.

True to form, Baby had her little arm tucked up behind her head and completely out of view. She was very happy to share her feet with us though, and her gorgeous little face (I am over the moon to see she’s gotten her daddy’s mouth and lips). She even yawned three times on the camera; totally surreal. But she would not show us her arm.

And between that, and the photo we’d received earlier that day of her left hand throwing us the high-five, I felt like she’s telling me that enough is enough too.

Stop looking for answers.

Stop looking for solutions.

I’m absolutely OK, Mum.

I am OK.

I’m going to be OK.

I cannot wait to meet you, but all in good time.

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I dreamed a dream

As soon as we received the news that our baby was going to be born without a right hand, I knew that I’d seen it all before.

A dream, from a few nights before, resurfaced with vivid clarity before the ultrasound had even been completed.

I’d been holding my laughing baby girl and she was missing her hand. There was simply a clean stump at the end. It had been a fleeting dream, one I had barely acknowledged, pinning it down to just one of those crazy pregnancy visions (of which I had been having many).

I knew then, even if the consultants weren’t sure, that she was a girl. I knew too, in the bottom of my heart that my daughter would be ok. In fact, she’d be more than ok; she’d be a healthy, happy and energetic young lady, strong willed and passionate.

However, The dream and that underlying surety certainly did nothing to discount our fears over the following two weeks as we awaited more answers.

The experience has given me a stronger understanding and respect for my intuition, a tiny voice I’d never listened to before. It was a memo to me that as I embark on motherhood for the first time, my gut instincts and intuitions are there to protect my baby and I. They’re those tiny voices in the back of your mind, the ones we discount first, the ones we reject. Yet they’re only there to help, to look out for us.

After all this, I’m planning to make a promise to myself to listen, first and foremost, to myself before I start listening to the outside world.