Celebrating the Mini Milestones

This week has been a week of mini milestones in the Though She Be But Little camp.

Tomorrow our pregnancy hits 37 Weeks. That is officially full-term in baby language, so our little lady is free to make her grand entrance any time from now and we’ll be over the moon when she does!

Today was also our last ever appointment with our foetal medicine consultant. A pretty momentous occasion. I’ve lost count of how many scans we’ve had since our 20-week routine scan way back in March, but I’m pretty sure it’s reaching the high teens, if not well into the twenties. It was an odd feeling to say goodbye to her today, knowing that post-natal care and investigations will be handled by a whole different raft of professionals. It felt like something big, a huge achievement, like both we and Baby have graduated somehow. The scan showed that Baby is growing well, and despite my sporadic lack of acceptance, that her right hand definitely isn’t there. The sonographer said again that there might be some kind of digit, but without much conviction. I’m not sure if they just say that because they think that’s what I’m wanting to hear, but we don’t have long to wait to find out now.

We got a great shot of her chubby face. I have to admit I was the only one in the room who couldn’t see it at first, until I realised that I was looking for a face a whole lot smaller than the one on the screen. I can’t believe how much she’s grown and I can’t wait to meet her for real, rather than seeing the sonographic equivalent of her face pressed against the glass!

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Don’t panic if you don’t see it right away, I didn’t and I’m her mum!

This week has also seen a turn about in my mind. Throughout the pregnancy, exacerbated but not caused by the complications, I have suffered with severe anxiety and depression. An intense fear of birth (not helpful when you’re pregnant) has raised it’s ugly head time and time again and it’s only through reading as many Hypnobirthing books as I can get my hands on, combined with support from my specialist midwife and my foetal medicine consultant, that I’ve managed to create a positive ideal in my mind. It was my first midwife appointment today, after 9 months of appointments, where I was able to speak confidently and with positivity about my impending birth experience. Daily meditation and banning myself from negative readings, attitudes and thoughts have both played a huge part. Gaining the self-confidence to know for myself what information I do and don’t need and what birthing attitudes are simply detrimental to my mindset has been invaluable.

Another event that put the stoppers on the train tracks of my negativity was a baby shower. My friends and family came together for the most amazing day and threw me a baby shower in the stunning Tudor manor house of Kentwell. It was absolutely tipping it down, monsoon levels of rain, but underneath that awning, surrounded by my friends, it couldn’t have been brighter. One of the symptoms of depression I have suffered with has been a sense of isolation, of inherently being unlovable. These sensations are incredibly difficult to maintain when the people that mean the most rally around you like that. I’ve still not managed to adequately thank them for everything they’ve done and I’m not even sure they’re aware just what a significant impact that day has had on me. The whole weekend was topped off when I got home the following day to find that Ben, he of the inappropriate humour, had called in the troops (his brother, sister-in-law and my cousin) to decorate the bathroom, the nursery and to get the living room prepped for the decorators after a well timed bathroom disaster a few months ago. The entire weekend served to spring board me up onto a more positive level that everyone, from my husband to my midwife, has noticed. I just wish I had stronger words than ‘thank you’ to offer everyone involved!

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The Baby Shower Crew (minus 2!)
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The mother of all cakes!

With Baby’s nursery finally complete we now have a room to put all her things in. Knowing that, should she arrive tomorrow, we’d be able to function has been incredibly cathartic and made it all really very real. I’ve been living in a surreal bubble of disbelief for the past months. I know I’m pregnant (it’s difficult not to with her booting me wholeheartedly in the ribs all day) but the idea of actually having a baby has been illusive. Now I find myself drifting into the nursery at every opportunity and it’s the one place in the house I feel calm and at peace –I figure that’s a very good sign! I’ve been practicing my daily meditation and Hypnobirthing mindfulness sat on my birthing ball in there each day. With any luck, some of that serenity will linger in the room and she’ll sleep like a dream. One can always hope!

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The week is still only half way through but the icing on the top of the cake will come on Sunday, when my hockey team captain, Kimberley, hits the streets of London to run the Vitality 10k to raise money for Reach. She’s been training incredibly hard, no matter the weather – not even letting trivial things such as holidays interrupt her! Her amazing effort has seen us raise £380 for Reach so far, a total that continues to rise.

All money raised goes directly to Reach – a charity offering invaluable support and guidance to around 60 new families each year who’s child is born with an upper limb difference, or a ‘diffability‘ as I now like to call it.

  • £25 – Pays for a comprehensive Welcome Information Pack for one family. (Our pack was an invaluable source of support to me a few months ago – thank you so much!)
  • £30 – Covers the hire of a one-handed recorder for one year. (Worries about whether Baby would be able to learn a musical instrument have proved to be unfounded!)
  • £50 – Buys gadgets to help a promising swimmer to train through our Bursary.
  • £75 – Allows a child to spend one day at Reach Activity Week.
  • £100 – Is the cost of one workshop leader at the family weekend, to provide the children with fun, safe and interesting activities.
  • £250 – Pays for a child aged 10 -18yrs to attend the residential Reach Activity Week – an invaluable source of friendship, acceptance and fun.
  • £500 – Pays for a Reach member to have essential adaptations to their car so they can learn to drive.

A huge and heartfelt thank you to everyone who has donated so far and supported Kimberley throughout her training. Also a massive

THANK YOU

to Kimberley, for all of her hard work, dedication and training towards raising such an awesome sum of money!

We’re wishing her the best of luck (and weather!) on Sunday as she pounds the streets to ‪#‎Runthecapital‬.

 

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‪#‎ItsAbilityNotDisabilityThatMatters‬

 

The Choice Illusion

Today was the first of five NCT antenatal classes. We were both a little apprehensive. Ben was in full dodgy-humour mode and I was my usual cantankerous-self.

In a way our fears (although neither of us were sure what exactly we were nervous about) were simultaneously realised and eased. Just being around and meeting other people in a similar situation to us was a breath of fresh air. Everyone was friendly, welcoming and impartial, the tutor was excellent.

As the weeks tick by and my mind is starting to wander to the birth, I was fascinated to learn about the different hormones that play a part in the birthing process. With a particular anxiety around birth (something I’ve had pushed from my mind of late) I’m developing a keen interest in the concepts of Hypnobirthing (I took great umbrage at Ben’s concern that it may just all be “mumbo jumbo”) and other meditative strategies to keep myself calm during birth and to keep the good hormones flowing.

At the course it all turned a bit for me when we split into groups to discuss the myriad of different birthing options available to us. Nothing makes me want to stick two fingers up at my pregnancy more and when people start discussing our choices. I spent the first half of the pregnancy completely unable to even consider the thought of my baby and unable to look past the apocalyptic event which I viewed the birth to be. This, coupled with existing anxiety, spiralled out of control into me being diagnosed with “pre-natal depression” (I’m completely sure that I’d be in a much stronger position now, despite everything, if I’d not started from an already shaky  foundation!). It was isolating and frightening and, at the time, I’d been unable to find anyone else who felt quite the same way as I did.

That all changed somewhere in the middle of the second trimester when my new midwife brought up the idea of giving birth in a midwife-led birthing centre or even having a home birth. I had absolutely no idea up until that point that I’d had a choice outside that of giving birth in a hospital. As simplistic an idea as it may sound, it completely transformed my life at the time. I had gone from feeling like I was trapped on a conveyor belt with no means of escape and that it would all end, one way or another, in a hospital to suddenly finding myself leaping out of the trap and being handed control of the whole birthing experience.

I was liberated and totally and utterly excited. I could, after all, have a “normal” birth. I could be in a place that didn’t send my heart rate rocketing and those chains tightening in my chest. For one idyllic month I was making plans to tour the local birthing centres with my midwife, something I’d shown absolutely no inclination to do with the hospital maternity wards. I was excited again about Baby’s arrival, I no longer saw birth as the end of the road, but as the beginning.

Then the 20-week scan happened and my luxurious choices were lost to me. If I was (as the consultant put it) insane, I could definitely give birth in a birthing centre. But that it was strongly, strongly advised that I gave birth in a hospital. This, despite my attempts to convince them otherwise, was confirmed by every other consultant, midwife and paediatrician we have since spoken to. Those choices felt like a distant dream, and an illusion.

This has led, over the past six weeks to me feeling that I simply don’t care about the birth any more. So long as baby is safe, it doesn’t exactly matter any more what I want. It’s turned into an intense apathy. I don’t want to tour the hospital maternity ward. I don’t want to read any books on birth. I don’t care even remotely if I have a water birth or not, something that people keep bringing up. What does it really matter any more?

Perhaps this sense of being robbed of the choices I’d been so utterly transformed by and relieved to receive is where a lot of my anger lies. It’s an anger that I’m not aware of most of the time. It’s an anger that seems to bubble up any time we do something officially baby-related; scans, hospital appointments and, apparently, NCT courses too.

It’s an anger that’s the driving reason behind refusing any further scans or check-ups from now on. It feels almost impossible to feel entirely normal about the whole pregnancy ‘thing’ when any expectations you might have had have been wildly different to the reality. From 24/7 sickness, to depression, to anomalies. It’s been one thing after another that tells me that reading “What to Expect When You’re Expecting” is an utterly pointless exercise. Unless of course, you’re able to expect the unexpected. Something I hope we’ll be a lot more adept at should we have a second child!

This is a good point to stress that it’s not all bad, of course. I am acutely aware how much worse things could be. How much worse so many others have to go through, over and over again. I feel privileged, lucky and blessed when I think of the alternatives. However, those little gremlins on your shoulder start nibbling at you as you’re surrounded by other, less complicated, pregnancies. It gnaws away at you as you realise that you still have two months to wait, two months more of this anxiety and this cheerful pretence. Two months more until we’ll receive the best gift we’ve ever been given. It’s like being a child again, watching the clock in apparent stasis on Christmas Eve, feeling that you can’t possibly survive the torment of the wait until the next morning, all the while knowing that you have no option and savouring the excitment.

I thought it was very telling about our current mental state when, at the end of the session, we were all asked to pick one word from a whole raft of words to describe how we were feeling. As everyone went around they shared their words: ‘hopeful’, ‘empowered’, ‘confident’, ‘excited’ and ‘informed’. ‘Tired’ was the most negative word to come up. We picked anxious: Anxious and hopeful (impatient wasn’t an option). I know which one was running stronger as I left.