Fit for purpose: An amateur’s step-by-step guide to making an adapted lucky fin glove

Fit for purpose: An amateur’s step-by-step guide to making an adapted lucky fin glove

I should start this guide with a little disclaimer: I am not a seamstress of any sort. I’m an enthusiastic amateur who loves a bit of crafting with a purpose.

I love seeing my daughter get stuck in with anything and everything. She loves helping out in the garden and has been struggling to help us carry cuttings and rough objects around the garden with a pair of gardening gloves on. It’s one of the few times we see her get frustrated as the right glove repeatedly falls off of her little hand. She eventually throws the gloves on the ground and declares sadly that she “can’t do it”. The thing is, she absolutely can do it! Give her the right tools and equipment and she can do whatever she sets her mind to.

I’ve always believed that she should have clothes that fit her arm, and not have to feel like she’s trying to fit into a mould that she simply wasn’t made in. When she was small I used to adapt all of her baby grows and she’s incredibly lucky to have jumpers, gloves and cardigans knitted bespoke for her by Grandma and Great Granny!

I couldn’t find a suitable ‘how to’ online and, let’s face it, needing to chop all the fingers off a glove and make it half the size is not something that most people will have need of doing in the course of their lives! So I decided to take some pictures as a went along, with the view that it might be helpful for someone else if it worked and that no one need ever know if it went horribly wrong! ­čĄź

Happily, it was a success! It only took around 20-30 minutes (which was a shame as I was enjoying myself) and I only needed very basic tools (and skills!).

 

1. Find your tools

All I needed was a pair of gloves, tape measure, scissors, a stitch-picker, pins, a needle and some thread. Simples!

Luckily for me, had my experiment in crafting gone wrong I wouldn’t have been out of pocket too much as I found these kids gloves in the bargain bin at my local hardware store for 75p. With hindsight I should have gotten a few pairs!

I’ve had no luck finding decent baby/toddler gardening gloves, so these ones are still pretty huge on her, but at least she’ll grow into them. In the meantime, glove companies are missing a trick not making gloves small enough for the littlest people! I don’t know many toddlers that don’t love hanging out and helping out in the garden!

 

2.  Remove the fingers from the glove

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3. Unpick the seams

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Turn the glove inside out.  Cut through the cuff, unpick the seams around the hand of the glove and lay it flat.

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4. Cut to the right shape and size

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This is where your approach and mine might differ somewhat! I am not a perfectionist. I am a ‘that-looks-about-rightist’! I did measure my daughter’s little hand to start with, but I have to admit I didn’t do a lot with that information other than use it as a guideline.

I cut about 3cm off the cuff and then cut the hand of the glove into a tapered shape, removing the thumb of the glove at the same time. With hindsight, I should have made the angle on either side a little more even at this stage as the finished article is a little wonky. But it works, and hey, they’re for nothing more glamorous than digging in the mud and mess after all!

 

5. Pin in place and sew

I used a basic running stitch to sew the restyled glove back up. I kept the hem narrow to avoid it rubbing on her little hand and then doubled back along the stitching to make sure it was extra secure, as it’s going to be put through some fairly heavy use.

 

6. Turn the right way out and voila!

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Somebody was incredibly happy to try on her new gloves and to discover that they actually fit! Now all we need is a bit of warmer weather so we can get outside and test them out!

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