I made a little faux pas today. Unfortunately, while it seemed small at first, it was the kind of faux pas that might have far reaching consequences into a young girl’s future. It may even have scarred her for life. I feel terrible, of course, no more so because I failed to rectify my mistake at the time; no one wants to be the source of a child’s life-long fear.

Obviously, (at least I hope) I’m joking to some extent. It was hilarious as soon as I realised what had happened. Although, in reality, there might be some follow-up conversation required by the family involved!

It all started with the sun. It was the first time we’d seen it in months and to celebrate Hero and I headed out to visit a near by farm park for the first time. We did all the usual things, and we bought a bag of food to feed the animals. Well, I fed the animals at any rate. Hero tried twice to feed the sheep her five remaining fingers, so we’ll have to wait a bit longer until she’s mastered the flat-palm approach before she can safely do the same!

We spent a lot of time at a large cage with a few birds in it. The birds were fairly unimpressive in my opinion, the kind of birds we get hundreds of in our garden. But that wasn’t the point. Where Hero is concerned there is no such thing as a boring bird. Hero’s reaction to spotting a bird is something like I imagine a life-long Nessie hunter would feel after finally discovering that the prehistoric beast was real. It’s wonderfully, outrageously over the top with excitement.

She was poking her fingers through the bars of the cage (it was a very big cage, and there were very few birds in it, so I wasn’t too worried) in order to point very specifically at each bird, you know, in case I hadn’t spotted it yet. And it was during this moment that a brightly coloured parrot, one we didn’t even know was there until that point, dive-bombed her from on high and pecked at her index finger, drawing blood. (Life lesson: Don’t let your child put their fingers through the bars, even if you think the cage is empty!)

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This was taken before we learnt our life lesson…

There were of course a lot of tears and upset and, even after we’d washed her hands and carried on our journey around the park, Hero was a lot more hesitant to approach the animals too closely. She was just as fascinated and excited, only from a safer distance this time! I hoped that, by the time we reached the giant duck enclosure (the ducks were giant, as opposed to the enclosure – although, that was also a goodly size) that she would have recovered her earlier abandon. But unfortunately, she was instead a bit clingy and was bordering on tearful.

Enter stage right: A sweet little girl, out for the day with her family. She couldn’t have been more than four years old and she was a little concerned about Hero’s welfare. So I explained to the girl that Hero had been bitten by a parrot earlier on and that she was a bit nervous about the ducks. Job done. Situation explained – or so I thought. The little girl was quick to reassure Hero (erroneously, I believe) that the ducks were completely harmless and I was really touched by her genuine care. But despite her reassurances, the girl still had a little frown on her face. I had a moment of doubt that perhaps I shouldn’t have mentioned the parrot, maybe this little girl would be nervous around the parrot too now, but I didn’t think more of it than that. Whoops.

The family moved on and that, I thought, was that. At least until I heard the parents of the girl angrily calling her name. I looked around to see that the little girl had broken away from her family and, ignoring their shouts, was running back towards us with a look of great agitation on her face. When she arrived (parents still frantically shouting) she came straight up to Hero, pointed down at her missing hand and with a horrified expression on her face, said: “Did a parrot really eat her hand?!”

This was a bit of a crucial conjuncture in my life. I SHOULD have used this opportunity to, not only raise awareness about limb differences, but also to reassure the girl that parrots didn’t routinely tear off toddler’s hands (as far as I’m aware). Only the next few seconds happened so fast… I succeeded simply in blinking and then laughing in realisation before her family finally caught up with her and whisked her off.

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The tractor was much less frightening!

That poor kid. That girl might be about to go through life thinking that a parrot, a small, cute, innocuous little parrot, swooped down from on high and pecked the hand off a traumatised toddler. And that’s my fault! I’ve been on a campaign to raise awareness and understanding about limb difference for the past two years and I somehow left a girl possibly traumatised for life. I console myself that at least she’s incredibly unlikely to stick her fingers or hands into a birdcage from now on though, so perhaps I’ve at least saved her a nasty peck on the finger!

When we were pregnant with Hero we would joke around a lot as we were processing the emotions. We had a lot of fun coming up with fictional disastrous reasons as to why Hero might have lost her hand; they were stories we secretly hoped she would keep in reserve in case anyone was ever rude. It seems that, inadvertently, I’ve started the tradition a little earlier than I’d planned!

I’ve only got one hand… because a blood thirsty parrot ate the other one.

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Beware the terror from above!

So, to that little girl (and her family), I’m really sorry! I hope that you don’t have nightmares and I very much hope that you don’t develop an irrational (to some extent!) fear of parrots. I’m sorry that I didn’t succeed in raising any awareness this time around. But, thank you for making me smile all the same.

 

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All’s well that ends well

4 thoughts on “Five fingers, feathers and a faux pas: A sad day for limb difference awareness

  1. Lovely tale Amy, hope Hero gets over the shock of the parrot attack quickly, never trusted parrots they are way to screachy for me!

    Like

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