Some times you’re cruising along, as happy as Larry, when something someone says hits you right out of the left field. Some times you don’t even realise until much later, that the words have sunk deeper than you could have imagined and caused a rush of emotions you never expected.

Until recently we’d been incredibly lucky to have never been on the receiving end of any negative or hurtful comments about Hero’s hand. We have had a few flippant comments (“At least it’s just a hand!”), but generally her lucky fin has been met with curiosity, wonder and affection. The outside world, as well our circle of friends and family, has always been a reflection of my own outlook and the outlook we hope to foster within Hero.

This weekend, for the first time, I’ve been really shaken by something someone said. The comments came from a child, and I think were both innocent and well meaning. She was just making an observation and a judgement, as children do and probably adults as well. At the time they were spoken I didn’t really react, I brushed the comments aside with a joke and thought nothing more of it for the rest of the day.

Then I got into bed that night and those sentences kept coming back again and again. I just cried. My heart ached because I realised that I can’t protect her from comments like that. As she grows in independence and confidence, as she spends more and more time away from us, I can’t just hold her to me and shield her from things the world might say. Nor should or would I try to do so, as much as my emotions might protest.

I can’t walk up to every single man, woman or child that might come across her path, grab them by the collar and say, “please don’t hurt my child.”

I hope that we, her parents, her family and her friends, can instil within her such a sense of stability and self worth that these comments will just roll off her like water from a duck’s back. Because they certainly don’t roll off mine. The experience has taught me that I need to come up with a response. I’m a writer, not a speaker, and have always needed time to process my thoughts and reactions. Only now I may need to create a stockpile of responses which are both affirming and educating so that I can turn these comments around into something positive. Isn’t that what I’d like Hero to be able to do after all?

I hope that she never feels the same heart ache those comments have given me. I hope she can laugh right back at them knowing that she might look different but that’s ok. That’s more than ok. To the people who matter she’s perfect.

One thought on “Sticks and stones

  1. Thank you for another beautiful message. I know exactly how you feel. My son is 9 months now and I had on multiple occasions witnessed people’s confusion about his hand. I tend to think I am very comfortable with it, but every once in a while I really feel sick noticing those “long faces” starring at him when I look away. I guess it is smth me, us as parents have to deal with. Go thru this trauma, acknowledging that yes, i am hurt for myself, for him, for why us, etc….And get eventually this peace accepting it. No matter how much I tell myself that i am ok, very deep inside I know it us far from the truth. But..i am working on it. One day i will be ok. I know it 😊

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