After of months of acute anxiety, pre-natal depression and insomnia, Hero Gwenhwyfar was born on 5th August, and all of my worries literally melted away.

After emerging from my initial Darth Vader-impression-laden, drug-induced, haze I couldn’t help but smile. It was all over, everything I’d been worried about; all of it happened. It was the total and utter opposite of my impeccably detailed birth plan, yet none of it mattered. Not even slightly; it was all ok.

After inhaling and swallowing her own poop on the way out, Hero was whipped away from us within moments and taken up to intensive care on the neonatal unit, where she would spend the next six days receiving the best care possible while I recovered and pined for her on the ward above.

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I’d been secretly worried during pregnancy that the first thing I would want to look at when she was born was her hand. Parents at Reach assured me that that wouldn’t be the case, but secretly I doubted them. However, when she was placed in my arms, hooked up to a myriad of drips and monitors, all I could see was her absolutely perfect face. Her perfectly squished nose. Her perfectly fluttering eyelids. Her perfectly imperfect hand was the last thing I turned to.

Her hand was perfect. She has the ‘nubbins’ I was so worried she would. And despite all my fretting, all my stewing, I love each and every one of them. Since escaping the hospital, and the absolutely faultless NHS care we all received, there’s been the odd hesitation or double-take when people have met her. Each time it’s taken me a couple of moments to realise what they’re double-taking at – all I see when I look at her is perfection and I forget that others might see something else.

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There have been tears. I’m a hormonal first-time mum with a newborn, of course there have been tears. But in the 9-days since she arrived in our world I’ve only cried once for her missing hand. As I’d put my fingers against her she had tried to curl her little paw around one of them. She was trying to hold onto my finger, but there was nothing to hold on with. So yeah, there have been some tears, but not nearly as many as I was expecting. Now she’s arrived I see clearly; my girl isn’t disabled at all. She’s differently-abled and that’s something for her to be fiercely proud of.

And unexpected positive of her dramatic arrival was that the Paediatrician needed to X-ray her lungs. While she did so she X-rayed Hero’s little arm and her spine. They ruled out, once and for all, the chance of her diffability being a result of genetic issues. They ruled out, in short, anything more serious being wrong, the very worst-case they’d warned us about as they floated the idea of a termination after our 20-week scan. After that it was difficult to worry much about her at all. She was in the best of hands, and her rosy cheeks told us she was in the best of health, despite a little meconium on the lungs! Far from worrying about her, every time I saw her I was more confident of her health. After months of being told she’d be tiny, she’d be weak, she might even be seriously ill, I found it was almost impossible to worry overly about her when she had proved all of those fears wrong even in the first moments of her life.

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What’s in a name?

Another pre-birth worry, which has so far amounted to nothing, was about her name. Hero Gwenhwyfar.

We picked out the name Hero when I was just 16 weeks pregnant. We’d bandied about so many possibilities for her name, but after seeing Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing for the first time, the name Hero just stuck. It seemed to cover everything we wanted it to, it was feminine, yet strong. It was Shakespearean, yet classical. In short, it was perfect.

Then we’d found out about her hand. I panicked. Obviously we couldn’t name her Hero any more; people would think we’d named her that because she was disabled, because she was our “Hero”. When I voiced this concern to Ben he dismissed my worries out of hand.

“Are you going to treat her any different just because she’s missing a hand?” he asked me. Obviously my answer was a resolute no. So why then would I start by changing her name because of it? Let people think what they will. She was ‘Hero’ before she was missing her hand, and she’s ‘Hero’ now.

So with the anxiety fading away, with the depression evaporated, we are absolutely loving life with our tiny, beautiful, perfectly imperfect daughter and we can’t wait to see all the ways in which she’ll amaze us as she grows and develops over the coming months and years.

Welcome to the world little one, you could not be more welcome.

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5 thoughts on “Welcome to the World Little One

  1. Beautiful Ames, I’ve just read this out to Nick with a very croaky teary voice. Hero is truly beautiful ❤️❤️❤️

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  2. Having followed through every phase of this, I still managed to cry, yet again at the recollection. She is a wonderful babe with the BEST parents and an amazing life ahead of her xxx

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